NC block structure

An NC block consists of a

An NC block has a maximum length of 4000 characters.

The use of # commands (see Section Special functions) excludes the programming of other words in the NC block (except for the block number).

As a rule each block begins with a block number consisting of an N character followed by a mathematical expression. This expression is mapped in the display data and rounded off as an integer.

The use of block sequences (SEQUENCE) and program jumps ($GOTO) requires the unambiguous and ascending programming of block numbers.

Otherwise, the block number is of no significance for program flow. In this case the block number does not even need to be programmed in ascending order.

Example of a block structure:

NC commands conforming to DIN 66025 need not be compulsorily separated by spaces or tabs. When programming text commands deviating from DIN (control block statements, special functions, etc.), the syntax requires separating characters which are also useful to structure an NC program.

Examples of an NC program structure:

Without

numbering

% 100

"Block 1"

"Block 1"

"Block 1"

.

.

.

M30

Partial

numbering

% 100

N10 "Block 1"

"Block 2"

N20 "Satz 3"

"Block 4"

.

.

M30

Complete

numbering

% 100

N10 "Block 1"

N20 "Satz 2"

N30 "Satz 3"

N40 "Satz 4"

.

.

N700 M30

Words must be distinguished according to their significance into:

Several words may be in a block (exception: special commands from Section Special commands) whereby the processing sequence of control data within the block is defined by the controller. The programmer can then enter the individual words of an NC block in any order without this having any effect on processing. This programming manual contains special notes to point out exceptions.

The block end identifier normally consists of a combination of the control characters "CR” and "LF”.